I Love My Job…I Hate My Job…I Love My Job…

First off, your job and your life are separate entities. You can love your job and you can enjoy what you do and still be successful. You can even only mildly enjoy it, but if you take it seriously, you will be successful because you understand how important it is. That being said, what would you assess as your level of “love” for your current job?

Check out the infographic below. Maybe you aren’t as unhappy as you might think. And if you start applying yourself more at your work, you may start gaining more skills and experience, making you the perfectly skilled candidate for that new job you have been thinking of.

Of course, your level of “love” for your job might still be pretty tepid. If this is the case, contact us to get started with Creative Talent Management. Search our open positions and let us help you secure your next great position.

11 Things That Prove You Love Your Career [Infographic]

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prefer a job where I am politely ignored

Reasons to Job Hunt Even if You Aren’t Actually on the Hunt

Being more informed, career-wise is never a bad thing. Even if you aren’t quite ready to leave your current position, you should make sure you brush up on your interviewing and job-seeking skills.

Being happily employed is also nothing to sneeze at either. But that doesn’t mean that opportunities might not be available when you are not really looking for them. And you need to be open to these. They offer great opportunities to learn and improve interviewing skills and potential advancement paths.

Read on for three ways to be on the job hunt even if you are not actually on the hunt.

Assess Your Current Situation

You are probably pretty happy with your current situation, or at least you tolerate it. But take a look at your old job posting for your current position. Do you feel that you fulfill all the qualifications? Now find the same job posting from a competitor. Again, could you step into the same role at another company? Now find a job posting for a step up from your current position. Are you currently building your brand and qualifications to be a better more skilled professional?

Take those ever-important keywords in those job postings and use them to your advantage. When you know exactly what the next steps are in your career, it becomes easier to develop those skills and increases your networking chances and ability to pursue continuing professional development.

Keep Your Trajectory Always Going Up

While you have those comparable job postings available, ask yourself if this is where you intended to be at this point in your career. If you aren’t quite there yet, are you still on track to get there? You simply want your time to mean something. Your career is a big part of your life and you want every opportunity to help you get a step higher than you were before. If you think you are missing a skill, how can you learn more about it and add it to your resume?

Grow, Grow, Grow

Now grab that old job description again (the one for your current position). Assess your growth (or lack thereof). Have you grown in your position, in terms of responsibilities, salary, skills, etc.? This is a chance to sort of audit your current professional situation – whether you are happy or not.

Researching job postings might seem like only something to do when you are actively looking to change jobs. But the details included within them offer a plethora of information to help you assess growth potential in your job and to help you see exactly where to take your next professional step.

Your First Job Posting Resource

Contact an experienced recruiter at 800.338.4327. Simplify and expedite your job search (or research) process the moment you need it with Creative Talent Management.

 

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Warning Signs: It’s Time to Leave Your Company

We all have those days when we just can’t stand our jobs. But usually, those days are outnumbered by a lot more productive, not-so-bad, and even fun days at work. But if you find yourself feeling this way all the time, it may be time to find a new job. So, how do you differentiate between temporary annoyance with and full on antipathy towards your company and your job?Turtle Hiding in Shell-scared-changing jobs

Changing Jobs isn’t as Passé as it Used to Be

Not too long ago, people routinely spent year after year after year at the same job. And this wasn’t necessarily a negative. Instead, it was just the relationship people had with their career. But times have changed. The corporate ladder today sometimes means climbing it at different companies.

But jumping ship, (or ladder, as it might be), is nonetheless a daunting prospect. It is often easier just to stay put rather than to go to a new and unfamiliar company.

Feeling like you hate your job, or have lost interest in it, or feeling as though you have reached your peak there may not clearly come to you as an epiphany. So, how do you know whether your feeling toward your job is just temporary or actually the start of a downward spiral?

Compare your emotions to our emotion gauge. This will tell you whether you need to move on or just keep movin’.

The Old Feeling of Dread

Dreading your job is not helping your job prospects nor is it helping your employer. Feeling anxious all the time simply isn’t healthy. And if you do indeed feel this way ALL THE TIME, then you need to realize that this isn’t normal.

Try to figure out when your dread lessens. If you need a vacation, or reason to leave the office in order to lessen your dread, your job is telling you it is time to say, “bye-bye.”

Personality Smersonality

Every job creates stress. But usually this stress waxes and wanes according to project completion, promotion, etc. But if your personality has shifted due to your job, and has done so into the negative, your friend list might start losing members. You should not let your job take over your ability to normally react to situations – both happy and stressful ones.

Evolution

Human beings evolve. We change and adapt to our surroundings. Sometimes we change more than what is around us, and sometimes it is the other way around. But what if your company seems to be changing, and leaving you behind? A job that conflicts with your priorities can drain you physically and emotionally. Think about your job that now requires you to travel much more. If you also value family and personal time, this is not sustainable behavior.

Also consider whether your company is innovative and open to change and new ideas. If you thrive on a flow of ideas like this, then your positive attitude toward your job will slowly be waning.

Ten Years…and Counting

As mentioned above, staying at one company for decades was a plus. In today’s workplace, your company probably wants fresh ideas galore, and sorry, your lengthy tenure might not be seen as a positive. (One really can’t win). This might be the mindset of the higher ups in your company. On your end, even if you were gearing up to leave for another position, are your interviewing and job searching skills up to snuff? And of course, consider that being happy where you are doesn’t mean you shouldn’t think of brushing up on these skills anyway.

The Old Glass Ceiling (or Steel Ceiling)

The ever so common career promotion limit – the point at which you can go no further (at least at your current company). A company that is not invested in you and in growing you as a member of their team is an all too telling sign – and not a positive one at that.

Of course, the stalled growth is not necessarily due to a lack of skills on your part. Your own personal desires for career advancement might simply need to be achieved elsewhere. Also, consider the trajectory (or lack thereof) of your salary. Seeking out a new position might very well bring in more money.

Ready to Jump Ship (or Ladder)?

Creative Talent Management offers top creative and design talent opportunities. Let CTM help you find our next great opportunity. It is closer than you think. Get started today by calling one of our experienced recruiters at 800.338.4327.

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Snag that Promotion Today

handshake-business-promotionIt is human nature to always want a bit more (i.e. more money, higher social standing, better position or more responsibility). But wanting these is only part of the equation. You might even feel ungrateful because your current position isn’t really terrible, but you have an underlying feeling that where you currently are in your career isn’t quite enough.

You might have your eyes on a higher position or on another job. Regardless of your aspirations or perceived inadequacies in your job, consider the following tips to help you achieve that promotion.

Stay Positive
Thinking of rising above your current position while continuing your current workload is a daunting task. It sounds like a motivational speech; but it really is critical to maintain a positive outlook while in your current setting. Promotions don’t go to Debbie Downers. Constant frustration at work takes your mind off current performance and pulls you further back from successfully completing important projects.

Quick Put on a Happy Face Tip? Try calming yourself by taking a few moments to reflect—in the morning and then in the afternoon. Take some deep breaths or take a quick walk outside to clear your head.

Find Someone Who Actually Knows What they are Doing
Seek out someone in your own company (or through a friend at another company) who has gone through all these career-enlightening experiences before. You can find a mentor through both formal and informal avenues. Above all, seek out someone who likes, trusts and believes in you already, and who you can really talk freely with (i.e. not a stranger). Conversation runs both ways. A mentor needs to feel that he or she can offer up constructive criticism as well as helpful advice.

Quick Find an Expert Tip? When searching for a mentor, it is also helpful to seek out higher level professionals. People at higher levels have obviously been there longer which means they likely hold greater insight into the company overall.

Be Your Own Advocate
When you are on the path to a promotion, you need to be the one who is doing most of the pushing. Also, if you are the one behind a successful project, own up! It can be intimidating to step up, especially if someone else steals your thunder, but make sure you receive credit where credit is due.

Quick Get Yourself Noticed Tip? Track your projects and accomplishments. By specifically writing them down, you will be able to freely discuss them during promotion opportunities.

Do it for Free!
Well, maybe, not really work for free, but showing your desire to take on more responsibility illustrates to senior staff great potential. But of course, you probably already have plenty of actual paid work that fills up your time. Finding other projects to work on can help you develop other pertinent skills.

Quick Way to Volunteer Tip? Research potential volunteer opportunities within your own section as well as outside your department. Use these as chances to compare skills needed for these projects and compare with those currently utilized with existing projects.

Be a Never-Ending Learner
Improve your business know-how and show your employer you are serious about a promotion. Employers always want the most qualified individual to fill a position. Be that prime candidate by participating in a variety of learning outlets.

Quick Knowledge-Gaining Tip? Seek out seminars, conferences, and online courses to enhance understanding of your industry.

Ready to Snag?
Creative Talent Management has a range of open positions available right now. Your next opportunity is closer than you think. And your next promotion is even closer when you team up with CTM. Get started today by calling one of our experienced recruiters at 800.338.4327.

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9 Questions to Expect During Your Next Interview

handshake-job-interviewThe job search process can be very unfulfilling. Unless you score the position, it can seem like you are just going through the motions, day after day, with nothing to show for it. But each time you get the chance to interview, it raises the stakes. But getting an interview and acing the interview are two completely different scenarios. That is why you need to show up prepared.

Here are 9 questions you can expect to be asked during an interview as well as some tips for how to impress the hiring manager.

1) Tell me about your creative process.

Creative and design positions require unique perspectives. Hiring managers want to know what kind of designer you are, how you design, and where you get your inspiration. It is during this time that you can explain your design process and how long you spend on research, storyboarding, etc.

2) What do you do if you get in a creative rut?

Expect this question because it explains what happens if the creativity well runs dry? Do you give up and cave? Do you reassess the purpose of the design to see if you started at the wrong end? Maybe you change only certain aspects of it and rework just those. Your answer will also explain whether you can take feedback and how you work when you are in stressful environments.

3) In your previous design experience, what have been your roles?

With this question, you can explain your responsibilities, whether you just did the concluding phases, developed projects from scratch, or just strategized the end product? Have you worked face-to-face with clients, or just by yourself?

4) Practice situation.

The hiring manager might have you work through a practice situation to get an idea of how you approach a new idea. You should include how you might create your first draft. Then add in how you would go about targeting the right audience. Would you work with the client (and how)? How would feedback be received and how would you go about adjusting your design? You should be able to explain your process and why you would choose to do things this way.

5) Explain a time when your work was not well received by a client.

The hiring manager wants to know how you react to criticism. You need to be able to explain how you reacted. How did you go about finding what the client wanted to change? Answering this question will help illuminate your ability to address both design and results.

6) How do you stay organized?

Everyone organizes differently. One person’s chaos is another’s sense of order. Hiring managers might ask this question to gauge how you manage working on a variety of projects all at once. People on your team depend on you to finish your part of the project. So, you need to be able to share with others what they can expect during your design process.

7) How do you begin a project?

This question speaks to how you as a designer take what the client wants and bring it to life. Client work is all about results. You need to be able to explain or share the questions you ask clients in order to feel out exactly what the project entails.

8) Share a project you are really proud of.

This question will let you share what you consider to be your finest work. This is your chance to share your passions and the kind of design programs or styles you thrive on when using.

9) How do you work on a team?

Collaboration is a fact of life in a company. You don’t need to love everyone you work with, but you do need to be able to work with them and produce a successful product. This is a chance for you to explain how you work and share responsibilities with your team, bounce ideas back and forth, and take over when deadlines are near.

Connect with Us

Now that you have the ammo to ace those interview questions, contact us and check out our job openings. We will help you find the perfect fit and help you score that interview. Call us today at 800.338.4327 or email us at info@talmanagency.com.

The job search process can be very unfulfilling. Unless you score the position, it can seem like you are just going through the motions, day after day, with nothing to show for it. But each time you get the chance to interview, it raises the stakes. But getting an interview and acing the interview are two completely different scenarios. That is why you need to show up prepared.

Here are 9 questions you can expect to be asked during an interview as well as some tips for how to impress the hiring manager.

1) Tell me about your creative process.

Creative and design positions require unique perspectives. Hiring managers want to know what kind of designer you are, how you design, and where you get your inspiration. It is during this time that you can explain your design process and how long you spend on research, storyboarding, etc.

2) What do you do if you get in a creative rut?

Expect this question because it explains what happens if the creativity well runs dry? Do you give up and cave? Do you reassess the purpose of the design to see if you started at the wrong end? Maybe you change only certain aspects of it and rework just those. Your answer will also explain whether you can take feedback and how you work when you are in stressful environments.

3) In your previous design experience, what have been your roles?

With this question, you can explain your responsibilities, whether you just did the concluding phases, developed projects from scratch, or just strategized the end product? Have you worked face-to-face with clients, or just by yourself?

4) Practice situation.

The hiring manager might have you work through a practice situation to get an idea of how you approach a new idea. You should include how you might create your first draft. Then add in how you would go about targeting the right audience. Would you work with the client (and how)? How would feedback be received and how would you go about adjusting your design? You should be able to explain your process and why you would choose to do things this way.

5) Explain a time when your work was not well received by a client.

The hiring manager wants to know how you react to criticism. You need to be able to explain how you reacted. How did you go about finding what the client wanted to change? Answering this question will help illuminate your ability to address both design and results.

6) How do you stay organized?

Everyone organizes differently. One person’s chaos is another’s sense of order. Hiring managers might ask this question to gauge how you manage working on a variety of projects all at once. People on your team depend on you to finish your part of the project. So, you need to be able to share with others what they can expect during your design process.

7) How do you begin a project?

This question speaks to how you as a designer take what the client wants and bring it to life. Client work is all about results. You need to be able to explain or share the questions you ask clients in order to feel out exactly what the project entails.

8) Share a project you are really proud of.

This question will let you share what you consider to be your finest work. This is your chance to share your passions and the kind of design programs or styles you thrive on when using.

9) How do you work on a team?

Collaboration is a fact of life in a company. You don’t need to love everyone you work with, but you do need to be able to work with them and produce a successful product. This is a chance for you to explain how you work and share responsibilities with your team, bounce ideas back and forth, and take over when deadlines are near.

Connect with Us

Now that you have the ammo to ace those interview questions, contact us and check out our job openings. We will help you find the perfect fit and help you score that interview. Call us today at 800.338.4327 or email us at info@talmanagency.com.

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