How to be a Successful Designer

Being a Successful Graphic Designer
Source: https://www.pinterest.com/samanthat1259/infographics/?lp=true

You know the old adage that everyone and their dog thinks they are a graphic designer. It can really tick you off because REAL DESIGNERS spend so much time learning, honing their skills, and finding just the right way to “say” the intended message.

With that being said, designers also know that they have certain skills and personalities that others simply don’t possess. Take a look at the included infographic. Let’s work through this guide, digging into it to see if these skills are really specific to what designers need.

Sky is the Limit

This is great for designers, because often clients come to you with a general idea and want you to take it to the next level. Which means you need the ability to think way outside the box. On the other hand, I believe everyone has the potential to be great if they just put enough effort into it. So, this means that regardless of your career, you should always be pushing yourself.

Creativity Comes from Within

Any successful designer knows that they often have to try out numerous ideas before the right one works. But they also know that they shouldn’t give up until they find it.

Communicate

Don’t be surprised if your design is way off from the point if you don’t take the time to communicate about the goals of the project. Not only do you save time but you also have a much more enjoyable designing experience because you actually know what to do!

Get Your English Right

Proofread, proofread, proofread. And then check it again. You are bound to have missed something.

Develop Constantly

As much as you might think you are an expert, don’t forget that you should always be learning, learning, and learning. Each new skill or more experience with the ones you already have is another opportunity to add a new and different design method to your repertoire.

Practice Makes Perfect

Not sure how to approach a project? Wish you could make a design you see on a sign or online? Well, what is stopping you? Use these as practice clients and test your skills remaking these creatives.

KISS (Keep it Simple Silly)

Simple is elegant. Simple is concise. And simple is what wins people over. Don’t overly complicate your designs. Spend some time organizing what you foresee as your end product and work your way there. Then be willing to erase if it is just too busy.

Never Stop Learning

This one was sort of covered already above. But every time you use one of your skills, you are getting better at it. And each time you create a design, you are building a canvas to build others on or to use as a foundation to then go in a million different directions. So, never stop learning.

Be Persistent and Passionate

Being able to match exactly what a client has in mind can be difficult. But if you listen, ask questions, and are persistent, you will prevail.

Jack of All Trades

…And master of none. Being a jack of all trades is not often a positive because it implies the individual can sort of do a lot of things but each not very well. But with design, it has a different connotation. The more skills you can bring to a project means your final product will be miles ahead of the competition.

Acknowledge

Use your manners. It really is as simple as that. Don’t forget about those who have helped you along the way and helped you gain your skills. And then on the other side, remember that you were a newbie once too so help out others just like you were helped.

Want Your Creative Skills to Shine?

Creative Talent Management offers top creative and design talent opportunities. Let CTM help you find our next great opportunity. It is closer than you think. Get started today by calling one of our experienced recruiters at 800.338.4327.

 

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Navigate the Job Search Process: Explore Continuing Professional Development (CPD)

Advancing your career doesn’t happen in one day. But professionals in a variety of fields can improve their skills and knowledge by participating in Continuing Professional Development (CPD). Through CPD, opportunities abound in a variety of channels. Learners set objectives for themselves (e.g. specific skills to be learned or practiced) and afterward participate in self-reflection of the progress they’ve made.

Advancement in your industry might require a myriad of skills. Some are concrete and visible actions, while others are more subjective. CPD offers opportunities to hone these skills whether they require more physical or mental capabilities.

maze-navigating-job-search

Soft and Hard Skills
It is no doubt easier to measure hard skills (physical tasks) over soft skills (e.g. time-management, creativity, etc.). But job performance improves with both kinds. The desire to broaden your horizons illustrates workplace adaptability. And the very notion of wanting to participate in CPD is itself an indication of workplace and skill growth potential.

Sharing is Caring
Volunteering might be an excellent CPD option for someone wishing to change careers. Donating your time can get you in the right places at the right times. Additionally, you could also be the individual offering up the CPD to others. Showing others the ropes is a great way to stay fresh yourself.

Go for the Freebies
Online learning has taken off the last few years. This means that professional development can be had off and online. Check out YouTube and udemy for free (and paid) courses in numerous fields and subjects.

Legit CPD
Independently-guided CPD might not quite be intensive enough for some learners. To help with this, formal CPD is offered through organizations, associations, and companies. Offering staff these opportunities gives employees a chance to build deeper professional-to-professional relationships and interactions.

All learning might be the same to some people. But formal CPD takes the usual rote approach to a new impactful level. The information gleaned from these interactions is immediately at a higher more usable level. Learners can see the information in action.

Did You Read that Somewhere?
Absorb the literature within your chosen field. Such information is often written by those right in the thick of the industry themselves. Consider publications, articles, trade journals, and news. Stay up to date with new business practices, innovative technologies, and the right skills to learn to put you at the top of the applicant pile.

Don’t Forget to Reflect
CPD is not just about absorbing a few bits of information from professionals. For CPD to truly be effective, the learner must be active throughout the entire process. Reflection is critical to successfully improving your skill and knowledge base. Use the exercise to grow, both career-wise, emotionally, mentally, and educationally.

Enhance Your Career with CPD
Use CPD to gain an edge in your field. Find a mentor, enroll in an online course (independently or through official channels), read, volunteer, research, and more to improve your knowledge base and skill set. Organize it yourself or seek out professional opportunities. Either way, become an active learner in your future endeavors. Reflect on the knowledge gained and use it to take you where you want to go.

Enhance Your Career with the Right Community of Professionals
Contact an experienced recruiter at 800.338.4327. Simplify and expedite your job search or posting process the moment you need it with Creative Talent Management.

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9 Questions to Expect During Your Next Interview

handshake-job-interviewThe job search process can be very unfulfilling. Unless you score the position, it can seem like you are just going through the motions, day after day, with nothing to show for it. But each time you get the chance to interview, it raises the stakes. But getting an interview and acing the interview are two completely different scenarios. That is why you need to show up prepared.

Here are 9 questions you can expect to be asked during an interview as well as some tips for how to impress the hiring manager.

1) Tell me about your creative process.

Creative and design positions require unique perspectives. Hiring managers want to know what kind of designer you are, how you design, and where you get your inspiration. It is during this time that you can explain your design process and how long you spend on research, storyboarding, etc.

2) What do you do if you get in a creative rut?

Expect this question because it explains what happens if the creativity well runs dry? Do you give up and cave? Do you reassess the purpose of the design to see if you started at the wrong end? Maybe you change only certain aspects of it and rework just those. Your answer will also explain whether you can take feedback and how you work when you are in stressful environments.

3) In your previous design experience, what have been your roles?

With this question, you can explain your responsibilities, whether you just did the concluding phases, developed projects from scratch, or just strategized the end product? Have you worked face-to-face with clients, or just by yourself?

4) Practice situation.

The hiring manager might have you work through a practice situation to get an idea of how you approach a new idea. You should include how you might create your first draft. Then add in how you would go about targeting the right audience. Would you work with the client (and how)? How would feedback be received and how would you go about adjusting your design? You should be able to explain your process and why you would choose to do things this way.

5) Explain a time when your work was not well received by a client.

The hiring manager wants to know how you react to criticism. You need to be able to explain how you reacted. How did you go about finding what the client wanted to change? Answering this question will help illuminate your ability to address both design and results.

6) How do you stay organized?

Everyone organizes differently. One person’s chaos is another’s sense of order. Hiring managers might ask this question to gauge how you manage working on a variety of projects all at once. People on your team depend on you to finish your part of the project. So, you need to be able to share with others what they can expect during your design process.

7) How do you begin a project?

This question speaks to how you as a designer take what the client wants and bring it to life. Client work is all about results. You need to be able to explain or share the questions you ask clients in order to feel out exactly what the project entails.

8) Share a project you are really proud of.

This question will let you share what you consider to be your finest work. This is your chance to share your passions and the kind of design programs or styles you thrive on when using.

9) How do you work on a team?

Collaboration is a fact of life in a company. You don’t need to love everyone you work with, but you do need to be able to work with them and produce a successful product. This is a chance for you to explain how you work and share responsibilities with your team, bounce ideas back and forth, and take over when deadlines are near.

Connect with Us

Now that you have the ammo to ace those interview questions, contact us and check out our job openings. We will help you find the perfect fit and help you score that interview. Call us today at 800.338.4327 or email us at info@talmanagency.com.

The job search process can be very unfulfilling. Unless you score the position, it can seem like you are just going through the motions, day after day, with nothing to show for it. But each time you get the chance to interview, it raises the stakes. But getting an interview and acing the interview are two completely different scenarios. That is why you need to show up prepared.

Here are 9 questions you can expect to be asked during an interview as well as some tips for how to impress the hiring manager.

1) Tell me about your creative process.

Creative and design positions require unique perspectives. Hiring managers want to know what kind of designer you are, how you design, and where you get your inspiration. It is during this time that you can explain your design process and how long you spend on research, storyboarding, etc.

2) What do you do if you get in a creative rut?

Expect this question because it explains what happens if the creativity well runs dry? Do you give up and cave? Do you reassess the purpose of the design to see if you started at the wrong end? Maybe you change only certain aspects of it and rework just those. Your answer will also explain whether you can take feedback and how you work when you are in stressful environments.

3) In your previous design experience, what have been your roles?

With this question, you can explain your responsibilities, whether you just did the concluding phases, developed projects from scratch, or just strategized the end product? Have you worked face-to-face with clients, or just by yourself?

4) Practice situation.

The hiring manager might have you work through a practice situation to get an idea of how you approach a new idea. You should include how you might create your first draft. Then add in how you would go about targeting the right audience. Would you work with the client (and how)? How would feedback be received and how would you go about adjusting your design? You should be able to explain your process and why you would choose to do things this way.

5) Explain a time when your work was not well received by a client.

The hiring manager wants to know how you react to criticism. You need to be able to explain how you reacted. How did you go about finding what the client wanted to change? Answering this question will help illuminate your ability to address both design and results.

6) How do you stay organized?

Everyone organizes differently. One person’s chaos is another’s sense of order. Hiring managers might ask this question to gauge how you manage working on a variety of projects all at once. People on your team depend on you to finish your part of the project. So, you need to be able to share with others what they can expect during your design process.

7) How do you begin a project?

This question speaks to how you as a designer take what the client wants and bring it to life. Client work is all about results. You need to be able to explain or share the questions you ask clients in order to feel out exactly what the project entails.

8) Share a project you are really proud of.

This question will let you share what you consider to be your finest work. This is your chance to share your passions and the kind of design programs or styles you thrive on when using.

9) How do you work on a team?

Collaboration is a fact of life in a company. You don’t need to love everyone you work with, but you do need to be able to work with them and produce a successful product. This is a chance for you to explain how you work and share responsibilities with your team, bounce ideas back and forth, and take over when deadlines are near.

Connect with Us

Now that you have the ammo to ace those interview questions, contact us and check out our job openings. We will help you find the perfect fit and help you score that interview. Call us today at 800.338.4327 or email us at info@talmanagency.com.

Read More

8 Questions Your LinkedIn Profile Should Answer

Employers really do look at your LinkedIn profile. It should not be left to gather dust bunnies and cobwebs. It can be your first impression to a potential employer and you don’t even know it. Employers want to be able to find out certain bits of information about you without really having to do a lot of work.

Ask yourself these 8 questions to see if your LinkedIn profile hits high marks on the impressive scale.

1) What is Your Current Job Title and/or Position?LinkedIn Icon

This sort of seems obvious. Employers need to see your current employment details. Make it your headline on your profile to snag their attention even earlier. Also, make sure that your job title properly reflects your abilities. Think about how you describe yourself when you meet new people or discuss career-related topics. This might offer you a chance to reflect and truly express your skill set.

2) How Do You Back Up Your Job Title?

This is your chance to be as thorough as you can. This is where you present your background and qualifications. List locations, companies, titles, as well as your responsibilities. Also, try not to be too general. Since you won’t be in front of the employee offering commentary, you have to fully explain everything in your profile – for them to read, and not make them guess.

3) Are You a Strong Writer?

All of the above sections of your profile will be for naught if your writing is stinky. And if your writing skills are stinky, any potential employers will immediately see this and immediately click right on through to another candidate’s profile.

How can you instantly improve your profile? Check spelling, remove slang, or texting language, and overall poor grammar.

4) What Tools Do You Know?

Don’t just tell, show! It is critical to explain all of the software programs you have basic to advanced skills in. List tools, software programs, computer systems, and more that contribute to your experience. Also, add in how experienced you are with each tool.

5) How Do You Sell Yourself?

No one is going to sell you but you. How does your profile market your brand? Or does it? Your LinkedIn profile needs to tell employers what makes you different. This is where your creation of a tagline helps you stand out from the crowd. Also consider adding logo or design elements if you are graphically-inclined.

6) Are You Active?

Creating your profile and then letting it linger won’t help your career chances. It is important to show that you are active on the platform – through who you follow, post, etc. Make sure you stay in-the-know in your field, so it shows employers your desire to be ever-learning and gaining industry knowledge.

7) Do Others Think You Are Awesome Too?

Scoring recommendations for your skills, or be able to include quotes about your performance are strong additions to your profile. Some people may automatically offer these to you, while it is perfectly acceptable to ask trusted individuals to provide them to you.

8) What Are Your Famous for?

Don’t forget to include when you were tops! Maybe you won an award, or you raised sales or increased revenue for your company. Share the love! Tell employers through your profile. Because they aren’t going to just stumble upon it accidentally.

Polish up that Profile

A stellar profile needs a bunch of stellar opportunities. Let Creative Talent Management help you find your next opportunity. Get started today by calling one of our experienced recruiters at 800.338.4327.

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Are Robots the New Designers?

artificial-intelligence-robots-AI-HAL-2001-spaceAmazon has undertaken a new business venture: Artifical Intelligence designers. Using a process called, generative adversarial network (GAN), they hope to be able to design clothing through analyzing styles posted through social media and through photography. The AI program is supposed to be able to copy the design and develop new complementary ones. But what do real designers have to say about this?

We would love to hear your thoughts. Please comment below.

 

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