How to be a Successful Designer

Being a Successful Graphic Designer
Source: https://www.pinterest.com/samanthat1259/infographics/?lp=true

You know the old adage that everyone and their dog thinks they are a graphic designer. It can really tick you off because REAL DESIGNERS spend so much time learning, honing their skills, and finding just the right way to “say” the intended message.

With that being said, designers also know that they have certain skills and personalities that others simply don’t possess. Take a look at the included infographic. Let’s work through this guide, digging into it to see if these skills are really specific to what designers need.

Sky is the Limit

This is great for designers, because often clients come to you with a general idea and want you to take it to the next level. Which means you need the ability to think way outside the box. On the other hand, I believe everyone has the potential to be great if they just put enough effort into it. So, this means that regardless of your career, you should always be pushing yourself.

Creativity Comes from Within

Any successful designer knows that they often have to try out numerous ideas before the right one works. But they also know that they shouldn’t give up until they find it.

Communicate

Don’t be surprised if your design is way off from the point if you don’t take the time to communicate about the goals of the project. Not only do you save time but you also have a much more enjoyable designing experience because you actually know what to do!

Get Your English Right

Proofread, proofread, proofread. And then check it again. You are bound to have missed something.

Develop Constantly

As much as you might think you are an expert, don’t forget that you should always be learning, learning, and learning. Each new skill or more experience with the ones you already have is another opportunity to add a new and different design method to your repertoire.

Practice Makes Perfect

Not sure how to approach a project? Wish you could make a design you see on a sign or online? Well, what is stopping you? Use these as practice clients and test your skills remaking these creatives.

KISS (Keep it Simple Silly)

Simple is elegant. Simple is concise. And simple is what wins people over. Don’t overly complicate your designs. Spend some time organizing what you foresee as your end product and work your way there. Then be willing to erase if it is just too busy.

Never Stop Learning

This one was sort of covered already above. But every time you use one of your skills, you are getting better at it. And each time you create a design, you are building a canvas to build others on or to use as a foundation to then go in a million different directions. So, never stop learning.

Be Persistent and Passionate

Being able to match exactly what a client has in mind can be difficult. But if you listen, ask questions, and are persistent, you will prevail.

Jack of All Trades

…And master of none. Being a jack of all trades is not often a positive because it implies the individual can sort of do a lot of things but each not very well. But with design, it has a different connotation. The more skills you can bring to a project means your final product will be miles ahead of the competition.

Acknowledge

Use your manners. It really is as simple as that. Don’t forget about those who have helped you along the way and helped you gain your skills. And then on the other side, remember that you were a newbie once too so help out others just like you were helped.

Want Your Creative Skills to Shine?

Creative Talent Management offers top creative and design talent opportunities. Let CTM help you find our next great opportunity. It is closer than you think. Get started today by calling one of our experienced recruiters at 800.338.4327.

 

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