What to do if Your Interviewer is 12 Years Old

baby-working on a computerLet’s say that you snagged the next step in a great job opportunity from Creative Talent Management. You are preparing for the interview and discover that the person who will quiz you is much much younger. Your nerves begin to tremble and you begin to worry about the entire meeting. How can you present yourself so that you don’t appear as know-it-all? Here are some tips for making a great impression.

The Elephant in the Room

You can assume that the interviewer has at least half a brain, so don’t start out the interview by bringing attention to their age either. Don’t insult them by being amazed that they could get to where they are even though they are so young. This is not a strong start.

Keeping Up with the Industry

Your youngin’ interviewee might assume that you have little to no knowledge of industry trends and thought leaders. Insert pertinent points about these so you alert them to the fact that you are in touch with the trends and care about continuing to grow in the position.

Keep it Recent

Unfortunately, a lot of people generally have little interest in things that happened before they were born. This relates to possible career points that have occurred maybe while your interviewer was a baby. Focus your experience on the most recent 10 years of your career. This way, you can show how perfect and qualified you are for the job, without appearing to be over-qualified.

Use Your Age to Your Advantage

Being older means you most definitely have experiences your interviews won’t. You will likely be able to showcase your ability management skills, budget allocation, and big successful business decisions you have made.

You need to be able to show your younger interviewer that your age is truly a number. If either party gets the impression that they are stuck in their ways or forcing new methods just for the sake of them, the partnership won’t work. Focus on the skills and experience of everyone involved.

Positives of Being at Your Previous Company for Decades 

Loyalty to your previous company is a good thing. But a different generation might see it differently. Explain to your interviewer the numerous opportunities you took to team-build, collaborate, and be flexible during your tenure. This will illustrate that you are willing and able to continue these excellent skills in this new position.

Ready to Take on Your Next Interviewer?

Contact an experienced recruiter at 800.338.4327. Simplify and expedite your job search (or research) process the moment you need it with Creative Talent Management.

Read More

I Love My Job…I Hate My Job…I Love My Job…

First off, your job and your life are separate entities. You can love your job and you can enjoy what you do and still be successful. You can even only mildly enjoy it, but if you take it seriously, you will be successful because you understand how important it is. That being said, what would you assess as your level of “love” for your current job?

Check out the infographic below. Maybe you aren’t as unhappy as you might think. And if you start applying yourself more at your work, you may start gaining more skills and experience, making you the perfectly skilled candidate for that new job you have been thinking of.

Of course, your level of “love” for your job might still be pretty tepid. If this is the case, contact us to get started with Creative Talent Management. Search our open positions and let us help you secure your next great position.

11 Things That Prove You Love Your Career [Infographic]

Read More

9 Questions to Expect During Your Next Interview

handshake-job-interviewThe job search process can be very unfulfilling. Unless you score the position, it can seem like you are just going through the motions, day after day, with nothing to show for it. But each time you get the chance to interview, it raises the stakes. But getting an interview and acing the interview are two completely different scenarios. That is why you need to show up prepared.

Here are 9 questions you can expect to be asked during an interview as well as some tips for how to impress the hiring manager.

1) Tell me about your creative process.

Creative and design positions require unique perspectives. Hiring managers want to know what kind of designer you are, how you design, and where you get your inspiration. It is during this time that you can explain your design process and how long you spend on research, storyboarding, etc.

2) What do you do if you get in a creative rut?

Expect this question because it explains what happens if the creativity well runs dry? Do you give up and cave? Do you reassess the purpose of the design to see if you started at the wrong end? Maybe you change only certain aspects of it and rework just those. Your answer will also explain whether you can take feedback and how you work when you are in stressful environments.

3) In your previous design experience, what have been your roles?

With this question, you can explain your responsibilities, whether you just did the concluding phases, developed projects from scratch, or just strategized the end product? Have you worked face-to-face with clients, or just by yourself?

4) Practice situation.

The hiring manager might have you work through a practice situation to get an idea of how you approach a new idea. You should include how you might create your first draft. Then add in how you would go about targeting the right audience. Would you work with the client (and how)? How would feedback be received and how would you go about adjusting your design? You should be able to explain your process and why you would choose to do things this way.

5) Explain a time when your work was not well received by a client.

The hiring manager wants to know how you react to criticism. You need to be able to explain how you reacted. How did you go about finding what the client wanted to change? Answering this question will help illuminate your ability to address both design and results.

6) How do you stay organized?

Everyone organizes differently. One person’s chaos is another’s sense of order. Hiring managers might ask this question to gauge how you manage working on a variety of projects all at once. People on your team depend on you to finish your part of the project. So, you need to be able to share with others what they can expect during your design process.

7) How do you begin a project?

This question speaks to how you as a designer take what the client wants and bring it to life. Client work is all about results. You need to be able to explain or share the questions you ask clients in order to feel out exactly what the project entails.

8) Share a project you are really proud of.

This question will let you share what you consider to be your finest work. This is your chance to share your passions and the kind of design programs or styles you thrive on when using.

9) How do you work on a team?

Collaboration is a fact of life in a company. You don’t need to love everyone you work with, but you do need to be able to work with them and produce a successful product. This is a chance for you to explain how you work and share responsibilities with your team, bounce ideas back and forth, and take over when deadlines are near.

Connect with Us

Now that you have the ammo to ace those interview questions, contact us and check out our job openings. We will help you find the perfect fit and help you score that interview. Call us today at 800.338.4327 or email us at info@talmanagency.com.

The job search process can be very unfulfilling. Unless you score the position, it can seem like you are just going through the motions, day after day, with nothing to show for it. But each time you get the chance to interview, it raises the stakes. But getting an interview and acing the interview are two completely different scenarios. That is why you need to show up prepared.

Here are 9 questions you can expect to be asked during an interview as well as some tips for how to impress the hiring manager.

1) Tell me about your creative process.

Creative and design positions require unique perspectives. Hiring managers want to know what kind of designer you are, how you design, and where you get your inspiration. It is during this time that you can explain your design process and how long you spend on research, storyboarding, etc.

2) What do you do if you get in a creative rut?

Expect this question because it explains what happens if the creativity well runs dry? Do you give up and cave? Do you reassess the purpose of the design to see if you started at the wrong end? Maybe you change only certain aspects of it and rework just those. Your answer will also explain whether you can take feedback and how you work when you are in stressful environments.

3) In your previous design experience, what have been your roles?

With this question, you can explain your responsibilities, whether you just did the concluding phases, developed projects from scratch, or just strategized the end product? Have you worked face-to-face with clients, or just by yourself?

4) Practice situation.

The hiring manager might have you work through a practice situation to get an idea of how you approach a new idea. You should include how you might create your first draft. Then add in how you would go about targeting the right audience. Would you work with the client (and how)? How would feedback be received and how would you go about adjusting your design? You should be able to explain your process and why you would choose to do things this way.

5) Explain a time when your work was not well received by a client.

The hiring manager wants to know how you react to criticism. You need to be able to explain how you reacted. How did you go about finding what the client wanted to change? Answering this question will help illuminate your ability to address both design and results.

6) How do you stay organized?

Everyone organizes differently. One person’s chaos is another’s sense of order. Hiring managers might ask this question to gauge how you manage working on a variety of projects all at once. People on your team depend on you to finish your part of the project. So, you need to be able to share with others what they can expect during your design process.

7) How do you begin a project?

This question speaks to how you as a designer take what the client wants and bring it to life. Client work is all about results. You need to be able to explain or share the questions you ask clients in order to feel out exactly what the project entails.

8) Share a project you are really proud of.

This question will let you share what you consider to be your finest work. This is your chance to share your passions and the kind of design programs or styles you thrive on when using.

9) How do you work on a team?

Collaboration is a fact of life in a company. You don’t need to love everyone you work with, but you do need to be able to work with them and produce a successful product. This is a chance for you to explain how you work and share responsibilities with your team, bounce ideas back and forth, and take over when deadlines are near.

Connect with Us

Now that you have the ammo to ace those interview questions, contact us and check out our job openings. We will help you find the perfect fit and help you score that interview. Call us today at 800.338.4327 or email us at info@talmanagency.com.

Read More

Read Between the Lines of that Job Description and Improve Your Odds

door, find career, choose career pathLengthy job descriptions seem to say everything and nothing about a job. Use the tips below to decipher what’s really going on and increase your odds of scoring the position.

The very reasoning behind job descriptions is to offer applicants an opportunity to gauge their abilities and learn about exactly what the job entails. But not every company uses the same phrases, layout, length, and more. Because of this, candidates are faced with having to read between the lines in order to figure out even the most basic pieces of information about the job.

So, what parts of the job description should you focus on?

The Opening Paragraph

Just like first impressions are important when you physically meet someone, the same holds true with the opening words from a company. Opening sentences need to be unique and not just read like a template, dry and basic. Did the company personalize the opening hoping to entice potential candidates?

First Bullet Points

There is a reason that bullet points are used in writing—to differentiate information. So, in job descriptions, bullet lists are meant to draw the attention of the reader, because the information is important.

The first few bullets that begin telling you job duties more often than not represent a majority of the entire job. The initial bullets could be as high as 80% of the job’s responsibilities. This makes sense because as a description is being written, the hiring manager first thinks of the most performed tasks and places those at the top of the list. Subsequent tasks are added later on, but are likely performed less often in the job.

As a candidate, take note of these specific job duties. Make sure they are reflected on your resume, so your application is immediately viewed as being more representative of the company’s desired candidate.

Required Skills or Experience

This section needs little discussion because employers often put down specific years of experience they desire, equivalent years with degree, and skills needed, etc. So, read this section carefully so you can highlight the right experience and specific skills on your resume. Most companies are looking for candidates that can join their team with little to no extra training needed.

Description of the Company

This section offers you a glimpse into the company culture you would enter if hired. Companies might employ words such as: energetic, growing brand, millennial, fast-paced, etc. Compare your general personality and work personality to gauge whether a fit could work for you.

Specialization is the Key

Not every job is the same. So, don’t try to use the same resume for every job. It is critical to highlight your strengths according to what the company is discussing within the job description. Pull out specific experiences, skills, examples and more. When you know how to decipher those job descriptions, use the information you now possess to your advantage.

Try Out Your Insider Knowledge

Now that you have the insider knowledge for deciphering job descriptions, try it out as you peruse the variety of talent offerings available through Creative Talent Management. Your next opportunity is closer than you think. We are your source for expert talent managers. Get started today by calling one of our experienced recruiters at 800.338.4327.

Read More